Who on earth is Paul du Feu, Phenomenal Man?

It was said of Flaubert that he “delighted in bizarreries“. C’est moi, aussi.

One such delectable morsel relates to the author of the poem, Phenomenal Woman, a snippet of which I’ve featured in the “Quote for the week”, Maya Angelou.

Angelou is the American author of, among many books, the startling volume of autobiography called I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the story of her first 17 years during which she was raped by her mother’s boyfriend. The man was jailed for the offence and found dead five days after his release, kicked to death, the rumour went, by Angelou’s brothers. Angelou promptly became mute for years, believing

my voice killed him; I killed that man, because I told his name.

This was the first of many tribulations and triumphs in Angelou’s life including her time as a prostitute and brothel madam, her career as a dancer and her close involvement with the civil rights campaign of Martin Luther King.

If there’s any woman who could have, would have, written a poem like Phenomenal Woman, it’s Angelou.

Angelou has also been married three times, once to a man named Paul du Feu.

Now it so happens that a Paul du Feu was also married to Germaine Greer, the Australian-born feminist and author of the worldwide bestseller, The Female Eunuch. It was her first and only marriage, and it lasted three weeks. She left, she says, because she couldn’t be faithful.

Greer is famous for her wit and mischief – she had taken on Norman Mailer in a debate at New York’s Town Hall, been photographed naked and bent over looking between her thighs at the camera on the front cover of the 1970s magazine, Suck, and once written a weekly gardening column for the satirical British magazine, Private Eye, using the nom de plume, Rose Blight.

As unlikely as it sounds, it appears the one man, variously described as a builder, construction worker, carpenter, journalist – and my personal favourite, “remodeller” – married these two huge and mighty women. I haven’t been able to confirm it was the same Paul du Feu, but somehow it seems even more unlikely there were two such “builders” who married such women.

All of which leaves me wondering, who on earth is Paul du Feu and what could he be like?

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65 thoughts on “Who on earth is Paul du Feu, Phenomenal Man?

  1. If it’s one person he must be quite amazing in his own right. According to Angelou’s bio, however, he was a British builder and according to Greer’s he was an Australian journalist. But the only mention I can find of him is that a guy by that name married those two women.

    Being famous solely based on whom you married reminds me for some reason of that wonderful quote by Camille Paglia. Speaking of her critics she said, “The only thing they will be remembered for is the nasty things they’ve said about me.” I’ve also read it reported as “The only thing they’ll remember about my enemies after they’re dead is the nasty things I’ve said about them.” I think the former is a little more refined and worthy of Oscar Wilde while the latter is kind of snarky.

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    • I like that quote, either way really. Yeh, I couldn’t find corroboration that the Paul du Feu is the same one. Only I think I heard it somewhere.

      I met Greer once when she was teaching at Cambridge (though that wasn’t where I heard it … she didn’t exactly whisper it to me as we were shaking hands). I was never so looked up and down.

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    • Yes, he is truly a phenomenal man. A Realtor in Berkeley for many years, author of In Good Company as well as Long Legged Women, Cosmo centerfold and a fantastic friend!

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      • Hello Gail. You may not have had a chance to read the other comments. One is from his son advising that Paul passed away on Jan 1 this year. My condolences on the loss of your friend.

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  2. He is the same man in both cases. You’d never know it to speak to him. He is also known as the British Burt Reynolds for his nude Cosmo centerfold in 1972.

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    • In 1973, shortly before marrying Maya Angelou, he published a book called “Let’s Hear It For The Long-Legged Women”. A racy if rather disjointed and episodic account of his life up till then, written with infectious gusto. And including a pretty full account of how he met, married and separated from Germaine Greer.

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  3. I knew Paul du Feu after his brief marriage to Germaine Greer had ended. I must have met him in 1969/1970 through the writer John ‘Tito’ Gerassi for whom I was working at the time. A diverse and fascinating group of people turned up at Tito’s flat in Maida Vale to help with the proof-reading of his latest book. Paul was one of them: he was with a lovely English girl whose name eludes me. He was a great guy – I adored him. I’d love to know where he is now.

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  4. I found this, too, from 1982 (you’ve given me a mission!):

    ‘When Caged Bird was published in 1970, the critics were generous—as they were the following year over her first volume of poetry, Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water ‘fore I Diiie. At a London literary party Maya met Paul du Feu, a carpenter and construction worker who had acquired some notoriety himself as Germaine (The Female Eunuch) Greer’s ex-husband and as the first nude centerfold for British Cosmopolitan. She fell deeply in love, and they were married in 1973, settling on the West Coast. Paul remodeled and built houses, while Maya expanded her career. She directed for film and television, acted on Broadway and in TV’s Roots (in which she played Kunta Kinte’s grandmother), and co-authored the script of the TV-movie Caged Bird.
    ‘Then “the eternal, never-to-be-broken-up marriage” failed. Maya is reluctant to discuss why. “I know that I’m not the easiest person to live with,” she says. “The challenge I put on myself is so great that the person I live with feels himself challenged. I bring a lot to bear and I don’t know how not to.” Paul is now living alone in the Bay Area. “I love Paul du Feu and I feel like seeing him right now,” says Maya, “but it would just drag me.” She has had difficulties with men before. “I have lost good men—or men I might have been able to turn into good men — because I have no middle passage,” she says. “When a voice is raised to me, I think, ‘You want to kill me, but you don’t have the nerve. Get out. Immediately.’ I know I have taken it to the extreme—he might only have said, ‘I don’t like the way you cook the rice’—because I take everything to the max.” ‘

    http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20081615,00.html

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    • Hi Heather. I like your mission. There’s something in these stories, isn’t there? When I first looked at the photo he reminded me a bit of John Denver, the singer, but his face is narrower. He’s got that sexy foxy look. I like the glimpse into their life together, with him building houses and MA getting bigger and bigger. It’s sad what she says about the old automatic fear leading her to cut people off.

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  5. He is my husband’s cousin. Unfortunately he hasn’t seen Paul since the 70s. I believe he lives in California, but that’s about all I’ve been able to find out.

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    • Paul is my first cousin. Can you let me know who your husband is and how he is related to the Du Feu family please. I am trying to compile a family tree. Paul’s father was Bernard.

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  6. I met Paul in 1958 when we both enrolled as graduates at Westminster Teacher Training College and took up the woodwork option. He told me he was converting properties in the Paddington area and would I like to join him which I did. Very shortly we gave up going to College and worked full time on his properties for the rest of the year. However we were both sent to the same school in Tottenham to do our teaching practice at the end of the year, so the College had not entirely forgotten us. I did read his book about Long-legged blondes which covered the year mentioned above. My wife whom he knew, was a long-legged blonde, and I, never figured in his book although I knew several of the people he mentioned. We assumed that we and our lives were too boring and uninteresting to be included, because after we parted in 1959 we both became teachers, and nothing could be more boring than that, although Len Freddi, mentioned in the book was also a teacher. He had two children by his first wife and one of these, Danny, came to the notice of my wife whose new colleague had recently been teaching him. We only met Paul once after 1959, in a drinking club one afternoon in Paddington. He is certainly someone one does not easily forget.

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    • Marvellous comment. The phrase “drinking club one afternoon in Paddington” conjures up a world. Laughing at nothing being more boring than teaching. Is that the case? Well, I’m so glad I’ve never been a teacher, though I can tell you I’ve also had my share of boring jobs.

      I’m charmed by the progress of this comment thread. Who knew it would turn out like this? I could almost write a book about him. And I can tell now he is a special man because all his commenters speak fondly of him.

      There’s something that’s confusing me, however. Someone mentioned the long-legged woman of the book fame was none other than Germaine. And yet Germaine is a brunette. And she’s also one woman, not women (much as Australia’s media pundits would have us think otherwise). Please tell me he wasn’t glorifying just any woman who wandered by??? Could it be the book about long-legged blondes is your book, with of course one long-legged blonde featured above all? ;)

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  7. Paul was my dad. Sadly, he died on NewYears Day 2013. He married three phenomenal women in all, the first being my mum.
    He wrote a couple of not very good books about his life: “Let’s hear it for the long legged women” & “In good company”.

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    • Hello Peter, I’m very sorry to hear of your dad’s death. I get that he was an extraordinary man, and there are many people who read this thread who will mourn him. I used to dream he would one day read this thread and see how he was loved. Please accept my condolences and my best wishes to you and your family.

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      • Thanks for your message. While we are all very sad, Paul had been unwell for a long time, so there is relief too.
        I spent a very interesting year with Paul and Maya in 1980/81. But our communication over the years was only occasional.
        He was a very clever man and a free spirit. His attraction for powerful women is no surprise.
        I think that the centrefold thing and the title of his first book were meant to be a couple of fingers up to The Female Eunuch herself.
        As for Maya, she has always been wonderfully supportive.
        Thanks for your interest in him. For better and for worse, he lived life to the full.

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      • I get the relief. It’s confronting to see another’s suffering and not be able to alleviate it or bear it for them. I like your description of him and I would have liked to have met him. Thank you for your generous comment. My condolences to you and your family. I will read his book.

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    • Hallo Peter. I had been reminiscing on my days working in an advertising agency in my home town London back in 1971. The agency was called Pembertons and was opposite Madame Tussaud’s in London. That is where, as a 16 year old, I met your father (who was at the time 20 years older than me). We spent many enjoyable evenings together in the London pubs drinking pints and talking about anything and everything. We each had a song at the time which we would often play on the juke boxes. He’d put on ‘Keep on Dancing’ for me and I’d put on ‘A Rose in Spanish Harlem’ for him. We had some fun and innocent times together in London. I remember him telling me that he had two children (both sons I believe) with his first wife. One who was a year older than me and one a year younger than me at the time. We lost contact after we both left the advertising agency. I believe he worked at the BBC for a while afterwards and I went to work for a fabrik design company.
      I wish I could have got to chat with him one more time. I shall remember him fondly and with a smile.
      Rosie Ladner-Cole (then just Rosie Cole)

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      • Hello Peter. Glad to hear you enjoyed an old story. Paul left the agency a couple of months before I did. We met before Paul was in Cosmo. I do believe he was also pictured in the centrefold of a daily newspaper (I think it may have been the Daily Mirror, but I’m not sure anymore). I know this because the guys at the advertising agency had laid the paper out open across my desk at work so that I saw it first thing when I came in. (I always read books on my way to work so I hadn’t seen the paper at all that morning). I guess they couldn’t resist taking the Mickey out of me as it was well known in the agency that Paul and I were often out together. : – ) I never did find out who was responsible for putting it on my desk, but I had my suspicions. : – )))
        I think your Dad saw me more as a ‘fun to be out with’ naive 16 year old ‘daughter’ type of girl. I never heard Paul ever speak badly of women and he was always very nice to me. Actually I think he really enjoyed female company and admired them, but was thrown into situations that were not always kind to him.
        Someone did tell me once that he had moved to the States, but as I left England in 1975 and eventually settled in Innsbruck in 1976 I lost contact with most people I knew in England and that was it. Over the years I have thought back on the short, but fun time we had together.
        Is he now buried in London Peter? I’d like to visit his grave next time I’m in town, if he is.
        Thanks for reading Peter.
        Rosie
        rosie@cole.at

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      • Yes, they are good memories. I also remember him taking me round to friends of his to eat one evening. I can’t remember where they lived in London any more, but I do remember the guy’s name which was Howard. I just can’t remember his wife’s name. Shame. I can still picture them and their flat in my mind (I have a ‘picture’ rather than a ‘name’ memory).
        He also came round to eat at the flat I lived in in Pimlico together with my older sister and a friend. That was amusing as we didn’t have a table so we all ate with our Food on our laps. : – ) After eating Paul and I popped to the pub at the bottom of Moreton Terrace road for a couple of beers. He mentioned that some guy sitting at the table next to us was a film director – John Schlesinger. I wouldn’t have known the guy from Adam to tell you the truth, but Paul did.
        I’m sure I’ll remember a couple more stories later. If I do I’ll post them here for whoever is interested.
        Rosie

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      • Hey Peter! I just remembered something else. Whilst Paul was working at the advertising agency ‘Pembertons’ he was ‘script-writing’, BUT he spent most of his time working on script text for the girls’ comic ‘Jacky’ – I think it was called that (earning extra money on the side). Maybe you can still find some of those old ‘Jacky’ comics around where he is mentioned. I remember noticing one a few months later in that comic that I had seen him write in the agency! : – )

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  8. Ah1…Germain Greer what a fascinating woman. One of my three favorite of this world’s women, of public figures’ notoriety. The other two being Simone de Beauvoir and Gloria Steinem. What a great emptiness would be felt without their presence in their respective heydays. Thank you dear lady for your thoughtful reminder of what intelligence these fabulous, and highly intelligent women brought to society to shake up those stodgy chauvinist, so-called men of those backward times. Sadly there are still far to many of those insecure males left, especially in positions of power, who stand in the way of, again so-called, democracy. JJ

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    • I like your comment very much, “what a great emptiness would be felt without their presence in their respective heydays.” Bravo!

      Germaine is a favourite character of mine. She is marvellously intelligent and human, and also something I think commentators can miss — esp commentators here in Aust who mostly ridicule her — one of the world’s great comediennes. She is Feste to our Twelfth Night.

      I know so little about Gloria Steinem except that she got married for the first time when she was in her 50s or 60s and this excites me. Simone de B, I want to love, and yet always I see before me the face of Sartre and am disturbed.

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      • When Gloria Steinem turned 40, someone said to her ” oh you look too young to be 40″, and she replied,”Not at all, if you live life naturally, this is what 40 looks like thank you.

        As to Simone de Beauvoir, Sartre treated her badly, but she got her own thru those times, and especially in the end, where he was begging. Regardless she was a brilliant women who left her mark on her gender and the rest of humanity in many respects. JJ

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      • I think it’s the disparity in physical beauty that disturbs me. And the fact that Sartre’s appearance does not seem to have impeded his ability to receive love and adulation from many many women and the world.

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      • Interesting you should think this, considering the high level of intelligence of the major players. The physical aspect of attraction being far down the line if existed at all for the likes pf Simone and most of the other participants who formed that intellectual socialist circle of the era. It was primarily about intellectual coupling and challenge. Besides women are far more imaginative than men in what constitutes the physical necessities , at least at that level, that draws male and female to each other, details of which best be discussed on another more appropriate medium, than an open forum such as this. Old habits of propriety automatically kicks in, as to liberty of expression, with the exception of when it comes to poetry. Though it is tempting to pursue, I yield giving you the choice of venue. Have a nice Sunday. JJ

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      • I think wherever there’s a great asymmetry I feel uneasy: asymmetry of power, influence, beauty, money, etc. In her letters to Nelson Algren, her “beloved Chicago man”, she wants what any woman would want.

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      • You’re right, but in the end, for reasons that involved her early decision that “marriage was impossible” and her never ending long lasting relationship with Sartre, Algren walked and never came back. In any event a tortured time for tortured people. JJ

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      • You are pointing to something which is maybe the source of my uneasiness about SdB.

        It’s clear she chose Sartre and her life in Paris over Algren and the possibility of a new life. There is honour and loyalty in her choice, and also, as I read it, some inauthenticity. Like all human beings she found the possibility of freedom frightening; faced with it, she chose again her own particular brand of bondage, playing second fiddle to Sartre. In the end, she repudiated all that Sartre had advocated, and at the same time, bound herself to him.

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      • Right on! Which goes to show that extremely high intelligence does not necessarily make for control over ones emotions, nor the strength to discipline intellectual power over ones feelings. As highly intelligent as Sartre was, she was more so, as an example, in philosophy at École Normal Supérieure, for the highly competitive agrégation for postgraduate national ranking, the jury narrowly awarded Sartre first place instead of Beauvoir, a female, who placed second. At age 21 the youngest person ever to pass the exam. JJ

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  9. And yet she did come second. Let me tell you a fairytale I am making up here and now …

    For a woman like her, at her deepest levels, the second would have been intolerable. And her whole life subsequently was given in response to this second. Was not her famous book about The Second? She had to fetishize it, you see, because of the original wound. Had to prop up Sartre’s reputation, his “genius”, because the alternative — that she was robbed of her true prize — was too much to bear. Thus, she clung to him and his “superiority” ever more firmly.

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  10. In 1988, my wife and I were house-hunting in Berkeley. Someone introduced us to Paul du Feu. He showed us a lot of unusual properties, all in need of remodeling. Our favorite was one he called “Remodel-O-Matic”, which needed even more help than most. During our many search expeditions, he told us (among other things) about how he was married to both Maya Angelou and Germaine Greer. We had no way of knowing whether he was BSing or not, so we halfway believed him. Looks like it was true. An interesting character with an interesting life!

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  11. I met Paul in 1985 when he and his current (at the time) life partner, Gail Blanchard, joined our sales team at Nakamura Realtors in Berkeley. That grew into a great friendship that lasted until I lost track of him in about 2005 or 2006. I dropped by to see him and he was no longer there. I was told he had become very ill and that his sons had taken him back to England. Paul was a great storyteller with a dry sense of humor that would catch us off guard and have us rolling. He was a wonderful friend, and talented carpenter who even did some work for us on our home. Sure, we knew of his marriages to these famous women, and to one not so famous which resulted in the children of whom he was so proud. But the most memorable thing about Paul is that he was a true friend who lived life to the fullest. My husband and I are truly sad to learn of his passing, yet grateful for the memories.

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  12. Paul and his first wife Shirley (your mum was indeed phenomenal, Peter) and I were in the same year reading English at King’s College London from ’53 to ’56. He was an amazing guy and a good friend – not surprised he went on to have an interesting life! My (sadly now late) husband Gordon and I went to visit them in Lambeth when Danny and Peter were toddlers; but we lost touch from then on. So sad to hear of his death.

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  13. Good to hear about Paul and Jackie magazine. I worked up at DC Thomson (Jackie’s publisher) in Dundee in the early 70s and heard the intriguing story that Paul had turned up one day, shut himself in an office and churned out a host of scripts, at terrific speed. He was there all day, and left in the evening with his payment in cash. I was just thinking of him today, and how unlikely the whole tale sounded, and decided to look him up in the old Google. It all fits in now – what a great chap!

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    • Yes, he was fun to have around. I remember us sitting in his office in the advertising agency just talking about everything and anything whilst he was writing for the Jackie mag. on the quiet. His office was one floor above mine and when (if) they missed me in my office they’d send someone up to Paul’s office to ‘collect’ me. That happened quite a lot. : – )
      I wish I knew if he was buried in London – and where if so. I would love to put a commemoration rose on his grave. : – (

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  14. I do not know if anyone else has mentioned it but Paul Du Feu released a autobiography in the early 80’s. I read it and thought it was a really good read. He went into great detail about his marriage to Germaine Greer.

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  15. TENDING the tomatoes in his garden in a rundown district of California, Paul du Feu is, these days, unrecognisable as the muscle-bound pinup who became Cosmopolitan magazine’s first naked male centrefold.

    The once lean body of the former London bricklayer – who became famous for his sensational three-week marriage in 1968 to outspoken feminist Germaine Greer – has thickened with age, while the long, brown, Seventies-styled hair is now silvery.

    While there are many pretty, tree-lined streets in the bohemian university city of Berkeley, overlooking San Francisco Bay, Paul’s is not one of them.

    Situated on a busy street, loud traffic noise competes with the television in the three-bedroom apartment 68-year-old Paul shares with Lottie, a retired beautician and his companion for the past ten years.

    Money is not in abundance, it seems. Since falling from a roof five years ago, shattering his arm, Paul can manage only the occasional building job, and to generate extra income the couple rent out a room. The friends he mixes with now have never even heard of Greer, let alone read her world-famous books.

    Paul rarely speaks about their notorious union, but admits, with a chuckle, that he rather relishes his status as the only man Greer – onetime anarchist and an outspoken opponent of the patriarchal institution of matrimony – deigned to take as her husband.

    Their marriage may have lasted less than a month, with Greer walking out after a series of domestic rows, but you are left with the firm impression that Paul secretly enjoys being a permanent blip on his ex-spouse’s otherwise flawless feminist CV.

    Why else would he have agreed, in 1972, to pose for Cosmopolitan – bible for the liberated ‘have-it-all’ generation of women, demanding equality from the bedroom to the boardroom?

    ‘A friend suggested it would be a delicious little irony for Germaine Greer’s husband to be Cosmopolitan’s first male centrefold, and it sounded like fun to me,’ says Paul. …

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  16. Last is copy of:
    I Was Mr Germaine Greer ( Our Marriage Lasted 3 Weeks – and That Was Three Weeks Too Long! He Was Cosmo’s First Male Centrefold. but Here He Reveals His Real Claim to Fame: He Was the Only Husband of the Feminist Icon

    Daily Mail (London)
    Daily Mail (London)
    May 21, 2004 | Copyright

    Permalink
    Byline: HELEN WEATHERS

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  17. I never met him but I happen to be an Australian from Melbourne, now living in Oxford. I grew up full of admiration for GG and that has only increased with all her marvellous books and journalism. Yesterday I read of Maya Angelou for the first time. I don’t know how I could have been ignorant of her remarkable life and promethean talents, especially as I am a connoisseur of polymaths. Anyway, as I read the Wikipedia biography I came across the fact of her marriage to Paul de Feu. I knew of course of his infamous marriage to GG. But why I am writing is that I unexpectedly met his grand-daughter recently at a cafe called Kazbar in Oxford where she is an unforgettably delightful staff member. I am a sculptor, musician and medical researcher, and we were talking of the possibility of her modelling for my sculpture. She is herself highly artistic, and ‘free spirit’ would describe her well. When we exchanged details I was stunned to recognise her surname and asked if she were related to Paul. She said that she was, and that I was the first person she had met who knew of him. And incidentally she is tall, slim, long-legged and in every way a beautiful person.

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  18. It is a sad day 7-15-15 I have found that my friend has passed. I hope he has the peace he deserves. I met Paul on September 11th 2001.
    Having woken up late my neighbor told me of the first plane hitting the tower. I turned on the TV and watched the second plane hit the second tower and eventually I was sickened by how CNN and their anchor commenting focused in on the poor souls who jumped to elude the fire.
    I walked down the café at Dwight and Sacramento to get away from the TV and was sharing a sidewalk table with a stranger under an invisible cloud of gloom and uncertainty trying to read the paper and after a while a man walks up and says “Where were you when WWIII began?” in the most chipper voice that was somehow not inappropriate and was perfect for the moment. He was talking to the man I was sharing the table with but included me anyway. The gloom left. He sat down and that began a daily ritual that lasted for more than 2 years for the three of us. No matter what his troubles he was an “Always look on the bright side of life” kind of guy.
    I genuinely like Paul. He did eventually tell me about his famous accomplishments and the women he married. I did not know of Maya or Germaine at the time so it never clicked with me that I should be impressed and asking him questions. He did say something about having lost his shirt trying to put on a play on Broadway with Maya. I had forgotten about the fall until I read it in a comment here.
    My impression from how he described his first book and what I had come to know of him in person was that “Let’s Hear It For The Long Legged Women” was sort of autobiographical but not necessarily unembellished. He was a very bright man who knew how to play to an audience especially if they were right in front of him. I feel like the more spectacular (at the time) things in it were meant to be just that so he could provoke the sort of negative reaction that gets positive cash flow going.
    It was a couple years after I moved on from Berkeley that I read Caged Bird and then Paul’s book. When I called our mutual friend to get his contact info or send a message to him about his book I was informed about his illness. Paul was in a care home in the Bay Area somewhere at that time and would go walkabout when he was bored causing himself and the staff grief.
    Apparently our friend had contacted Maya after one of these episodes and he did not know if she interceded for him or not. I suppose if his son’s did come get him that Maya was responsible for passing on the info.
    Cesar’s description was dead on.
    Rest in Peace Paul.

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  19. In 1972-3 Paul worked off and on for my father. Dad had a building company in London. There was a picture of Paul and my dad in the News of the World on a construction site in London. I remember that you could see an embroidered eye around a tear in his jeans, my mum did that. Nice guy to me at 18 years, and heard lots about his ex.
    Derek

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  20. Just happened to come across this, and it just goes on and on – till today – anyway, I’ve had plenty of cups of coffee with Paul in a kitchen in Kilburn in early 70s, well, 1971 to be precise. I was working as au-pair – and the family I worked for had bought a house, for rent – today’s BTL I guess, and Paul was doing it up for them. In fact, it was my “boss” had the first nude photo done . Had left and started a proper job – and imagine my surprise one day on the way to work, reading the Mirror, a photo of XXXX, and her friend – telling about the calendar. And yes, he was really nice.

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